Hair Colours: Why People Dye Their Hair

As it's PRIDE month, my mind has on the topic of hair coloring. However, a lifesaver for some is a creative endeavor for many. It seems like a trend to have a different hair color every month. Black, blond, red, brunette, purple, any color is good as long as it's chic. There are hundreds of varieties of hair colors—the brighter, the better, the wilder, the cooler.

Wearing a dapper color on your hair can create more diverse shades that embrace and mirror hues all around, making your hair appear more lively and noticeable. It can also help master frizzy hair by conditioning them and adding more density, protecting it from environmental hazards.


No matter how much buzz you have got, the ever-changing hair is something equally noteworthy. Similar to how hair systems have grown to be the most favored choice for hair loss in the LGBTQ+ community.


However, for me, it didn't click overnight. The matter was, I found grey hairs sprouting from my sideburns. I was startled. I also remember my friend, who used to hide her grey strands in the voluminous skin of her hair, but I couldn't do that. I didn't have a thatch like hers. So it was a matter of anxiety for me. Also, they mushroomed to a number very soon in my case. So I had to conceal them anyhow. Yes, hair color was the only recourse I had. But I have pleasantly realized that the benefits of coloring are far beyond just disguising the signs of aging.


Why would anyone want to color their hair?

When a person dyes their hair with a distinctly plucky color, they get noticed. It's out of the question not to see and want for a perfect-platinum-haired person walking down the corridor or the radiant-brown-haired girl in your yoga session.
If I talk about my personal experience, everyone seems to be talking about my new "achievement", about how "cool" and "elegant" it is. Maybe they like its glare. In fact, it all depends on how it turns out. Basically, it's the way you're known and described. These colors give you an identity that you love to associate with yourself.
Another reason why people dye their hair is simply a change. The same color that was the ultimate rockstar a few days ago seems to have made a boring old person of mine. Every month as I remember.
In fact, the urge to dye it is always there when I see my reflection in the mirror. After all, it's quite hard to restrict yourself from making easy changes when your hair can be noticed from a mile away. In fact, to me, bringing about a change provides a good reason to dye my hair. It seems like a good idea to me.
But there's an ambiguous question that always bothered me in the beginning. "Will coloring affect my hair?", "Will coloring my hair cause hair loss?"


Essentially, hair dying does not cause hair loss in a typical sense. It doesn't affect your scalp; no ingredient seeps through it. And the strands that are not grown yet are unaffected. But the grown hair can get damaged and might shed away.
As I can personally relate to this problem, I can assert that significant damage happens only when the coloring is too frequent.


Unfortunately, as I was convinced that it won't last a long-lasting effect, I kept on dying it almost every other month. As a result, a big part of it flew away. And, yes, the bleach content. The color should be having the minimum amount of bleach. If you also follow these guidelines, you can go with any possible color combination with as many iterations as you like.


What about coloring hair systems?

This is one of the best features of hair systems; this year will be the first time that I can color my hair in all the LGBTQ+ flag colors without the worry of hair shedding. As I have a number of hair systems, I can keep and reuse this PRIDE system I have created many times.

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